Heart Rate and Heat Soak

OK, so 6:08 hard fought miles today, just a little less than yesterday’s 10K race, but it was hot hot hot.

After a sprightly start @9:27/mile, my pace slowed to a drastic 10:59 during the last mile, which I partly walked. I wasn’t quite ready for the crash my sugar and carb-free day would bring me, along with some stifling late spring New York heat and humidity.

So here’s the chart – my old ticker Vs pace.

Heart Rate and Heart Soak
Getting Hotter and Slowing Down

I’ve been humbly reminded this evening what it’s like training during the summer! Yay for Fall Marathons!

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Half Way to 90

It’s been a while, but I’m back to cover the second half of my 2017 running, particularly as I am having another crack at the NYC Marathon in November. More of that later. For now, here’s a quick recap of 2017 so far.

Goals

I started the year intending to run at least 1,000 miles (last year I did 652 and my personal best was way back in 2014 when I ran 952 miles. It’s been all down hill since then! With 452 miles logged since the start of the year, and my official marathon training yet to start, I am pretty confident that I’ll get to 1,000 by the end of the year, even if I am very slightly behind schedule right now.

Lifetime Distance
All down hill since 2014

Another goal was to run all of the New York Road Runners ‘Borough’ races, plus the Marathon, so seven in total. I have managed to run four out of four so far, although my pace and progress has been hampered somewhat by niggling knee pain (pretty much classic Runner’s Knee). I have seen my pace slowly improve over the hour races from a pedestrian 10:08/mile in the Fred Lebow Half Marathon as the start of the year, to a relatively sprightly 9:10/mile in my latest race, a 10k in humid Queens, New York on my 45th birthday.

Queens 10k Finish
Who doesn’t love 98% humidity…

Hitting 45 Years of Age

Is 45 a milestone? It’s not like 21, or 40 or some other round number, but it somehow feels significant to me. It’s half way through my 40’s, so I am officially in my mid-forties, something that sounds like a generic term for pre-middle age. I started running 5 years ago (and started this blog then too) and while I improved pretty significantly in my first two and a half years, I do feel like it’s been a slow steady decline since then. However there is plenty of evidence that late starters can be very quick runners, even faster than people who start in their teens or 20’s, so I am quite determined to reverse this trend.

My best marathon time was in 2014 when I completed it in 4:33:33, whereas in 2015 it took me 5 hours and 25 minutes, almost an hour more. This year I am targeting 4:15, and have signed up for a training plan starting on July 17th to hit that target.

Nutrition

One last thing is that I’m going to focus a lot more on nutrition than I have previously. Starting today I’m focusing on cutting refined sugars from my diet. I am pretty ill-disciplined with food – it’s not that I exactly eat badly consistently, but I am prone to buying sugary snacks at the work vending machine, or on the way home, or just devouring cookies or chocolates from time to time. Time to reduce the gut!

Strength Training 

OK, here we go. I don’t know why I am some useless at this, but my lack of cross-training or strength training is almost certainly at the root of many issues I have with posture and injuries. I’ve had problems with my right leg for years. It’s either my ankle, foot, knee, hamstring or lower back, but always on that right side. So I will be adding planks, burpees, squats (including jumping squats) and my least favorite ever, pushups!

er… I’ll let you know how I get on.

OK enough typing for now… I need to go out for my 6 mile run, and it’s 79 degrees out with 80% humidity. Bring it on!

What a Difference 3 Weeks Makes

It’s certainly true that it takes longer to recover lost fitness than it does to lose it in the first place. However don’t ever let that put you off getting back into the swing of things if you’ve let your fitness regime slide and are worried about how long it will take you to recover most of it back. Let’s take a look at two 8-mile runs I did; one on Nov 6th (the day of the NYC Marathon) and one today a mere three weeks later.

The TLDR; version of this is that on Nov 6th, I ran 8 miles @10:04 min/mile for a total time of 1:20:37. On Nov 27th I ran exactly the same course in 1:16:23 @9:32 min/mile, which is just shy of my regular long run speed. The temperature was more or less the same (46 degrees today and 52 on Nov 6th) so that wasn’t really a factor. What was a factor was the average weekly mileage for the 4 weeks prior to the run. My average before today was 28.8, whereas my average prior to Nov 6th was 13.7, so less than half.

So here’s a breakdown mile by mile. After starting at more or less the same pace, 3 weeks ago I had to back off that pace quickly and never recovered. Today although I slowed slightly to a steady pace, I was able to maintain it for most of the run.

8-miles-v-8-miles
On Nov 6th I’m struggling to maintain my usual long run pace. On Nov 27th, I’m almost back to my usual training run time.

Another thing I looked at was my heart rate. Today there was a glitch because my watch was loose for the first few mins so it looks like a spike, but even accounting for that my average HR was lower today, despite a faster run, than 3 weeks ago.

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OK, so this is hardly scientific, and it was only a training run based on how I felt like running. But the stats, and how I felt while running tell the same story, which is after three weeks of gradually increasing mileage after a few months of barely keeping up, seems to have made a big difference.

Nest week I have a 4m race, the final one of the year and my marathon qualifier. It’ll be interesting to see if it’s quicker than the 4m race I ran last week.

Happy running!

4m Race to Deliver

Two weeks ago I set out to reboot my running after a rather lackluster summer. After that post, I ran 17.5 miles the following week, and I’ve just completed 19.5 miles this week ending in a ‘race’ today. Upping my mileage slowly in readiness for the Fred Lebow half marathon in January is the current plan.

Today I was only hoping to finish within 36 mins, and given my evening runs have been in the 10 mins/mile range was pretty sensible. I finished in 35:08 which is a bit better than I’d hoped.

 

race-to-deliver
Fall Races are Best!

I’m back on track to complete the 1000km challenge (You Vs Year on the Under Armor App) and I have one more race in 2 weeks in Brooklyn, which is another 4-miler. My goal is to beat the 35:08 I got today!

 

Happy Thanks Giving All.

Reboot. Restart. Marathon Day.

It has been five months since my last post, and I’ve had a somewhat indifferent summer of running and I’m heading toward a disappointing year. I set out with the best intentions and didn’t have the focus, will power or determination to see things through. My head hasn’t really been straight in regards to many things this year, perhaps I am falling into a mid-life crisis of sorts, but my running is definitely one area I thought I’d persevere. But I didn’t.

It all started reasonably well with 5k and 4m PR’s back in April… but I didn’t push hard enough in the Brooklyn Half Marathon to get my PR (course best but 3 mins short of my half PR). My Queens 10K was respectable, but again short of a PR I set in 2014 by about a minute. After that, I’ve done nothing special and frankly barely keep up the weekly miles to stay still – I’m struggling to maintain 10 mins miles.

Even the relatives easy You Vs Year challenge on MapMyRun / Under Armour challenge is now something I could miss out on. I’m barely 40km ahead of schedule, whereas at one stage I was 200km ahead.

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-6-26-12-pm
Just staying ahead of the baseline!

In the first half of this year, I averaged 16 miles a week (no a lot, but enough to maintain a point of fitness). In the second half of this year, I’ve average barely 8 miles per week. Not nearly enough to meet the goals I set out to achieve.

So what now? Well today is NYC Marathon day… I am going out for a run right now, will target 8 miles (a well known course I do) and take a look at my time and statistics Vs other times I have run that exact course, and see what I can do to pull things back into shape in the remainder of the year. I’ll be right back, after that run…

…back! So after a puffing 8.01 miles @ 10:04 pace, I actually feel a bit better about things. First of all, being able to run 8 miles non-stop after a pretty atrocious few months of barely keeping in touch with running, is somehow hugely motivational. My body seems to be telling me, I’m still hanging in there with you!

I have two 4-mile races coming up in the next 4 weeks, the first on Nov 20th and the second on Dec 3rd. It would be great to end the year on a high and set some new goals for 2017.

Also, yesterday I completed my volunteering for NYRR, which means I am on target to be eligible for next year’s NYC Marathon as well as running all of the major Borough Races; Fred Lebow Half, NYC Half, Brooklyn Half, Queens 10K, Bronx 10m and Staten Island half.

Onward and upward…

The Brooklyn Half Marathon – No PR!

It’s almost a week since I ran the Brooklyn Half marathon for the 3rd consecutive year, and if I am honest, I was really hoping I’d beat my half marathon PR of 1:56:07 after getting 2016 PR’s at 5K and at 4 miles. Although I did beat my course record from 2014, I missed out on a PR, and by quite a margin. 1:59:08 was my official time, a full three minutes short of my PR. I’m pretty disappointed, although perhaps it’s fate that I’ll have to beat this record at Staten Island in October, which is where I set it in the first place.

I am no 100% sure why I missed it by such a margin, but looking at the data my Garmin captured, it looks like it was a case of setting off too quickly.

All the way until mile 7, I was more than a minute ahead, and even at mile 9 was still 20 seconds ahead (although my GPS was buzzing a little before the markers at this point, as I was probably not running the most optimal route). Looking at the table below, getting this extra time at the start may have cost me later on.

Screen Shot 2016-05-27 at 6.18.29 PM
This is exactly what not to do in a race…

At mile 9 I’d fallen behind for the first time, and never got my pace back under 9mins/mile. By that time, I had planned to be running @ 8:40/mile or faster for the remainder of the race.

What’s quite interesting is looking at my stats from my watch at this point (below). I can see that although the race starts downhill (which should be easier), it’s also now on a straight with less crowding, what happens is my pace slows and at the same time my heart rate actually increases. I could understand if my pace simply slowed through tiredness, but my HR goes in the other direction indicates a lack of conditioning and readiness, which I wasn’t expecting. Or simply that banking almost 2 mins of time at mile 4 was a terrible idea! Yes… probably that…

Screen Shot 2016-05-27 at 6.06.16 PM
Here is what starting too fast does to you…

So, what now?

Well I have a 3.2 mile run on June 1st for the JP Morgan Corporate Challenge. I did this in 26:10 in 2015… so perhaps I can grab that PR instead!

2nd PR of 2016 – Red Hook Crit 5K

For the 2nd year running, my 5K PR has been set at the Red Hook Criterium 5K race, my official time was 23:21 beating last year’s 23:36 by 15 seconds. Five grueling 1000m laps, with a field packed with elite and sub-elite runners, I placed 208th out of 240 runners!

The Red Hook Crit is better known for its crazy cycling circuit, but in recent years the 5K has started to feature more prominently. This year the men and women ran separately. The men’s race was won by Abebe Sihine Mekuria in a breathtaking 14:45 (or 4:45 min/mile) with the second placed Jack Davies also finishing under 15 minutes with 14:53.

The women’s race was won by Zeineba Hasso Hayato in 17:36 and 2nd spot also under 18 minutes was Jennie Cohen with 17:59.

Last Lap
Closing in on the Finish Lane on Lap 5

So this is now officially the fastest 5K I’ve ever run, and 2016 is shaping up to be a good year for setting PR’s.

Screen Shot 2016-05-01 at 3.19.08 PM
3 races under 23 minutes

Next up is the Brooklyn Half. In 2014 I ran it in 2:00:11 just missing out of two hours, and my Half Marathon PR is still 1:56:07 on Staten Island in the same year. I should definitely beat my course record, although that PR might be a little trickier to get, given in 2014 I was at peak marathon fitness at that time.

Let’s see…